Ginger Root

Ginger Root

  • $2.39


Dried Ginger Root,

Zingiber officinale

Plant Family: Zingiberaceae,

Used for Ginger tea, Tinctures, Salves or in Ginger Extract Tea Blends.

Packaged in sealed retail foil pouch, always guaranteed fresh or your money back! We will also include a really cool, custom made, laminated index card that references your herb. It is yours FREE and a great way to reference your herbs.

 

Spicy, Aromatic and pungent, Ginger Root is often spoken of as only a Culinary Spice although it's use as an herb is appreciated by cultures all across the world.

Used as a culinary spice Ginger Root adds the perfect zest to beef, pork, chicken,fish, soups and stir fry! Ginger Root is an absolute favorite in Asian diets. Experimenting with Ginger can be a rewarding experience to the home chef. Ginger mixes well with apple flavorings, Banana Flavorings and makes the perfect addition to custom marinades.

 The use of Ginger Root as an herb can be dated all the way back to the 5th century BC. The root is native to the tropical rainforests in Southern Asia and was exported to Europe around the 1st century A.D. 

Ginger is a perennial reed like plant with leafy stems, growing up to 3-4 ft tall. The rhizome (root) is gathered when the plant starts dying back. It is dipped in boiling water immediately to prevent it from sprouting. Ginger root is grown commercially in warmer climates and prefers part to full shade. The plant can be grown in pots by the home gardener but it will need to be indoors during the colder months of the year. To start your own Ginger Plant simply find a root cutting and place it in well drained, loose soil, high in nutrients.

Scientists have found an impressive 477 chemicals in Ginger Root including ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, capsaicin, beta-sitosterol, beta-carotene, curcumin, lecithin, limonene, selenium and tryptophan. Each of these chemicals are used in various industry from culinary uses to herbal uses to scientific use and continued research.

The chemicals in Ginger Root were used in Folklore and by Native Americans as appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, carminative, anti-emetic, circulatory stimulant and diaphorhetic. Continued research is needed to hopefully one day obtain all of the benefits of this wonderful plant!

The information we share on this website is based on research from books, the internet, research papers, and personal experience with native plants. The information contained in this website should not be considered medical advice. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. For diagnosis or treatment consult your physician.

As with any food, allergic reactions can also occur with herbs. If you are pregnant or breast feeding do not use this herb. Speak with a medical professional if you have any concerns or adverse reactions.